The Letter of Tapera Nkomo ‘to you all who are in Johannesburg, friends believers in the Lord’

This morning I am invited to speak to the Synod of the Igreja de Cristo Unida em Mocambique. It’s been a challenge to decide what to say, since neither I nor, I am sure, they want me to summarize the entire story of their pre-World War II history. Doing a sketch of the high points doesn’t appeal to me, nor does choosing one event and dwelling on it. How to keep it short is another challenge, since I will be interpreted into two languages.

                             With Rev. Dr. Lusas Amosse

I finally decide to say something about their story and how it connects to the universal story. I emphasize that it is their story. True, Fred R. Bunker, a Congregationalist missionary from New England, comes to Beira first in 1892, and tries to establish a mission of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions here for a few years from 1905, but on his departure they are the ones, young men mostly, who begin to establish small Christian communities up and down the Buzi and Sabi (now Save) rivers, at places like Mashanga and Mambone, Sofala and Chiloane, Gogoi and Machemeje. This is, I say, your story.

I try to suggest that though they may have felt forgotten from time to time, they are part of the church universal, and can claim their rightful place in the one Body of Christ.

Their story – like the stories of churches everywhere – is not always a noble one, and I remind them that the Church is a very human institution. We sometimes, often, must disappoint God. Kamba Simango – he is my key figure in their story – surely must have done. And yet, I say, God works through us nevertheless. God works through Simango despite his failings, he a critical figure who continues to intrigue me. And so does Tapera Nkomo.

That’s what leads me to what reads like an epistle from Paul. It is written by Tapera Nkomo, in 1942, to young men from the region who find themselves working in Johannesburg. ‘I your brother,’ he begins, ‘let you know… that, in the town of Beira in the country of Manica and Sofala, there is a house of prayer to the Lord Jesus Christ. Dear friends, the door which has been shut many years is now opened. I say: Rejoice in the Lord because the gospel is now spread and preached in your country.’

Pastor Nkomo makes an appeal to these young men, then challenges them: ‘Get up young men. The sun is up, the day has come. Let us walk faithfully…. Love avoids doing any wrong to those who are staying with him, to one’s fellow man.‘I am asking for your prayers. I am also recommending you to the Lord our Saviour. Amen.

‘Good bye, dear friends. I am your brother who loves you.’

At the mornig break a lay leader comes up with a copy of the book for me to sign. ‘Take a photograph of us and send it to me,’ he asks.